George Mockford (1826-1899): Habits, Culture and Belief

I would not have any one here think that, because I have mentioned individuals who have raised themselves by self-education from poverty to social eminence, and even wealth, these are the chief marks to be aimed at. That would be a great fallacy. Knowledge is of itself one of the highest enjoyments. The ignorant man passes through the world dead to all pleasures, save those of the senses … Every human being has a great mission to perform, noble faculties to cultivate, a vast destiny to accomplish. He should have the means of education, and of exerting freely all the powers of his godlike nature.’

Samuel Smiles, from speech on The Education of the Working Classes given to a Mutual Improvement Society (1845). Developed later into Self-Help
Church at Broad Oak, Heathfield in Sussex today.

It is clear from this quote by Samuel Smiles that Mockford did in fact gain the knowledge due to his own habits, culture and beliefs. Mockford’s cultural activities are extremely important to his personal identity as these habits have not only changed his life, but have also changed the life of the clergy to whom he preached to throughout his 40 years as a minister at church at Broad Oak, Heathfield in Sussex.

Evident that Rockford left a lasting impression on those he spoke to and the place he spread his knowledge, there are still many memorials dedicated to him throughout the Broad Oak church.

Bibliography

Works Cited

Mockford, G. (1901) Wilderness Journeyings and Gracious Deliverances: The Autobiography of George Mockford, : J.C. Pembrey.

Samuel Smiles, from speech on The Education of the Working Classes given to a Mutual Improvement Society (1845). Developed later into Self-Help

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