Annie Ford (1920 Onwards) : War and Memory

The war was inevitable in how it impacted the lives of those in Great Britain. All different classes were affected by the turmoil it caused. Although in Annie’s memoir she does not focus solely on the theme of war, she does mention underlying connections of how the war created an impact on her own personal life as a child during the 1920’s and 1930’s. The knowledge and understanding of wartime recollections does not play a significant part in the memoir however I thought it would still be interesting to talk of the little involvement that is portrayed of the war in the memoir.

Annie mentions how Collyhurst Road and the community began to deter over the years of 1920 and 1930. “I think back the deteriation over the last twelve years was unbelievable. I suppose the war years took its toll” (p2). The war and its consequences for those living at home in Great Britain were the decline of standard in working class areas. Annie recognises that a “rougher and harsher element took over” (p2). The idea that the war created consequences for those already living in Collyhurst area is presented through Annie speaking in a critical tone about the new group of working class people entering the area. Annie explains “Collyhurst Road never regained its pride” (p2). Due to many areas of Great Britain being destroyed by bombs and the attacks of the war, many people had to move homes to a safer area. The area of Collyhurst is explained not to have “suffered war damage by bombs” (p2). This shows how although the war did impact the lives of men, women and children, those who lived in the area of Collyhurst were deemed the lucky ones as their own homes were never obliterated by the bomb attacks that sadly turned other peoples lives upside down.

Bibliography

Smith, Leonard V. ‘Paul Fussell’s The Great War and Modern Memory: Twenty-five Years Later. History and Theory. 40 (May 2001): 241-260

‘Mrs Annie Ford (Born 1920)’, unpublished memoir, 2:291, Burnett Collection of Working Class Autobiography, Special Collections Library, Brunel University. 2:291 FORD, Annie, Untitled, TS, pp.7 (c.2,000 words). Brunel University Library.

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